If the New York Post's "My Fair Lady" Piece Felt Like a Hit-Job, It's Because it Was

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Before reading any further in this column, I need all of you to click over to Michael Riedel's piece that ran in the New York Post on July 5th. You can click here to read it. 

All caught up? Good. Hopefully, as you were reading it, a couple of questions began to form. But one that should definitely be raised is, "Was this article necessary at all?"

I understand Reidel's methodology here. It's not every day one gets permission to publish extremely-candid quotes from one high-profile star bashing another. So clearly, from Reidel and the Post's point of view, there is a story to tell and clicks to get. 

But from my point of view, the whole article feels like a well-orchestrated hit on a show's leading lady by portraying her as either a selfish diva or a fragile performer, incapable of meeting the demands of a lead role on Broadway. Even if either were true, the fact that this has gone public is wrong and is certainly a violation of the unwritten rules of being in a Broadway cast: You don't air your dirty laundry in public, especially not to the press, especially not to Michael Riedel.  

I spoke to people involved with the production and there are differing opinions about the piece. One source loved it because "there was a lot leading up to this. It felt like a boiling point. The frustration was going to come out one way or another." 

Another member of the production agreed that this article stepped over some lines, "There are certain things that should be taken care of in-house. I think these types of opinions should always be addressed within the cast and creative. Stuff like this doesn't portray us well."

So where do the cast and creative of My Fair Lady go from here? I wouldn't blame Ms. Ambrose if she feels she has a theoretical bullseye on her back now. Whether that's something that is deserved, apparently, depends on who you ask. But it certainly looks as though some within the cast as more than willing to give you and anyone else, that answer.