It's Okay to Turn Down a Role, So Stop Punishing Performers Who Do

It's Okay to Turn Down a Role, So Stop Punishing Performers Who Do

I’ve seen many examples of amateur directors(and even some professional ones) that hold out grudges against actors who turned down roles they were cast in previous productions. It would seem that for these directors’ egos, actors must accept any roles in their productions if they want a shot at being cast again.

Now don’t misunderstand me, I think it’s wrong for an actor to quit a show right before opening for selfish reasons. But there is a vast difference between that and turning down a role that is offered to them.

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My Top 10 Musicals

My Top 10 Musicals

Every theatre lover has their favorite musicals for various reasons starting from the music to the dance numbers to their favorite actors or actresses playing a character in a show on Broadway. Whatever the reason, we always have certain shows that we gravitate towards or soundtracks that we just can’t stop listening to on our commutes to work. Through my years of being an audience member or actually working on a show, I’ve formulated a list of wide ranged musical productions that I like to call my top ten list.

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Release the DVD!

Release the DVD!

In the last few years I’ve noticed an explosion of Broadway musicals making their way to the big screen. And not as an adaption the way they tease us with Wicked or In The Heights. I’m talking about filming the Broadway (or West End) production in the theater, live, the way it is meant to be seen. And then releasing it in cinemas for those of us who couldn’t make it to NYC/London in time or who want to relive the magic all over again. Now I’m saying, “release the DVD!” If it’s on film, it could and needs to be released in DVD form. Here’s why.

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Why Are Playbills Abandoned?

Why Are Playbills Abandoned?

Many things happen after a performance ends. Actors get out of hair, make-up, costumes, and anything else that might go into becoming their characters. Stage managers write performance reports, accounting for any mishaps that hopefully went unnoticed by audiences. For me, currently, post-show activities center around scraping deviled egg from on stage plates and silverware, which allows me to notice the post-show activities of another of my colleagues in the theatre: the usher. After the audience files out, the usher sweeps through the rows of seats to tidy up before the next performance. There are discarded drinks, wrappers, headphones that will live in the lost and found for a while, and, if the world is fair, at least a little bit of fallen money. But none of that confuses me like the abundance of playbills I see picked up and headed for the garbage after a show.

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Ticket Prices for U.K.'s First StageCon Too High, So Event is Cancelled

Ticket Prices for U.K.'s First StageCon Too High, So Event is Cancelled

For theatre fans in the U.K. hoping for their own version of BrodwayCon, news broke last week that they’re going to have to keep waiting.

It was announced that the country’s first ever “StageCon” would be postponed until sometime in 2019. The reason? Backlash over the prices of tickets.

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"Voice of My City" Explores Jerome Robbins's Relationship With NYC

"Voice of My City" Explores Jerome Robbins's Relationship With NYC

The year 1918 was a good one for culture: it gave us Leonard Bernstein, honored with an exhibit at the Lincoln Center Library for the Performing Arts earlier this year, and also Jerome Robbins, born October 11th of that year, the current subject of such an exhibit, and the namesake of southern border of Lincoln Center Plaza, 62nd Street. Last spring, the library celebrated Robbins's centennial with "Robbins At Night," projecting images of Robbins and his work on the ground just outside its front door from 7pm to 1am, images that sparkled not just with Robbins's creativity but with the reflective specks embedded in the ground of the plaza.

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Healing After Higher Education

Healing After Higher Education

Writer, Elizabeth Gilbert said, “A vocation is a calling. A vocation is a divine invitation. A vocation is a voice of the universe in your ear saying we want you to do this thing, use your talents and gifts and make this thing.” That is what the theatre is to me. I received my invitation to this wonderful vocation at a very young age. I’ve kept my invitation close to my heart, and I will continue to show up as long as I live. I know this to be true. I even went and earned two degrees in theatre to show how “serious” I am about my craft and creativity. But, at what cost did my studies have on my relationship with the universe and my creativity?

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