A Los Angeles Theatre Announced Their Cast for "Little Shop" and the Internet is not having it

A Los Angeles Theatre Announced Their Cast for "Little Shop" and the Internet is not having it

Yesterday, a Los Angeles county based theatre company announced their cast for their upcoming production of “Little Shop of Horrors.”

While the Mogran-Wixson Theatre didn’t say which actors were playing which roles, let’s just say the cast lacks what you would usually see in most productions of the show.

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I Am Sick of Predators in High School Drama Clubs

I Am Sick of Predators in High School Drama Clubs

I wish I could look back at my high school theatre program and have fond memories, and reminisce about the first time I was coached in a scene, or sung for my whole school. For a few months after graduating, I could. But as I am currently writing this, I don’t feel fond towards my high school theatre program anymore. I get a feeling of dread when I remember that my theatre teacher was found to be engaging in sexual miscounduct with one of his students.

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Is it ever okay for non-disabled actors to play disabled roles?

Is it ever okay for non-disabled actors to play disabled roles?

We are familiar with the repellent days of “blacking up” – the disabled actors’ equivalent is “cripping up”, a term used by acting activists to highlight that it is not acceptable for a non-disabled actor to mimic impairments, then win an Oscar.

The acting union Equity has said that in casting “disabled” roles, “every avenue” should be considered to cast a disabled actor. Yet the challenges for disabled actors and the representation of a disability experience in film are not isolated to casting. Fundamental barriers to auditioning limit spaces for disabled actors; for those who do get work, it is still mostly for disabled roles written by non-disabled writers, which may present stereotypical or unrepresentative characters.

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The Fat Girl’s Diatribe Against the Theatre Community

The Fat Girl’s Diatribe Against the Theatre Community

The theatrical industry is, on the surface, seen as an inclusive environment full of openly accepting members who desire to experience the same kind of public appreciation an eighth- grade version of myself so desperately craved. As a young artist, it has only taken me less than a handle of auditions and feedback to realize that theatre was not the fat girl’s sport.

If you speak to the choreographer, they’d say that it’s visually unappealing to have an uneven amount of  “heavier” people on the stage than the other. If you speak to the costume designer, they say that it’s more difficult to create flattering costumes for the “common figure” a fat girl carries. If you look in the ensemble of a majority of running musicals, you will rarely find anyone that doesn’t fit an “average” body type to the production staff’s discretion.

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Being Autistic in the Theatre Community

Being Autistic in the Theatre Community

There are many things you could say about who I am as a person. You could say that I love the art of theatre, especially playwriting and still occasionally acting. Or you could say that beyond theatre and writing, I am also a die-hard fan of The Lord of the Rings, Star Wars, Batman and Harry Potter who is severely addicted to caffeine. (Although I will add that if that’s the worst thing I’m addicted to, I’d say I’m in relatively good shape.) Or more recently, you could also say that I am a writer here at On Stage who writes columns and occasional reviews that are read by a fairly large audience of theatre lovers that is growing every day. Those are just a few basic and important facts about me that are especially important for anyone who cares to know what kind of person I am.

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Being an Introverted Actor

Being an Introverted Actor

I am an actor. That being said, I also consider myself to be an introvert. This has caused confusion among people who only know me from endeavours outside of the theatrical world. Telling people about the show I’m in, or that I’d like to pursue a career in theatre often leads to responses like “You know, actors have to talk a lot right?” or “You’re going to have to learn to be more outgoing if you want to do that.” I never really know how to respond to this, or where to start, as these people probably have misunderstandings in two areas. One being what introversion really is and the other being what being a performer really entails. 

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The Need for More Native American Theatre

The Need for More Native American Theatre

I have been trying to be better about learning about Native American culture and stories, and one of the primary ways I learn about anything is reading. I've had "Seventh Generation: An Anthology of Native American Plays" for years, and it was my slow read over the course of this past November, a month I traditionally set aside for Native American stories. And what did I learn? Native American culture is alive and vibrant in theatre. Unfortunately, it is also almost invisible.

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“I Was Most Alive With You” Shines with a Shadow Cast

“I Was Most Alive With You” Shines with a Shadow Cast

My journey for Deaf Talent leads me to Playwrights Horizons in New York City. ‘“I Was Most Alive With You” is the work of writer Craig Lucas. It features a Deaf (and deaf) character, and an entire shadow cast that signs the dialogue from a balcony overlooking the action. Lucas was inspired to write this piece, and learn about Deaf culture, after watching actor Russell Harvard. He immersed himself in the language and people, and it shows in this touching and in-depth look into the Deaf World and the world of addiction. Lucas’ hard work pays off with simple references that those who live in the Deaf World will get with ease but gives those who don’t know a small lesson.

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Sondheim's Views on Whitewashing are as Antiquated as He is

Sondheim's Views on Whitewashing are as Antiquated as He is

Let me make this clear, I mean all disrespect towards Mr. Sondheim with this column. I’ll gladly recognize him as a monumental figure in musical theatre history, but in the same breath mention that he has massively disappointed me.

In an interview with St. Louis On The Air , Sondheim talked about some of the protests against whitewashing in productions of West Side Story and The King and I.

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There are Plenty of Reasons and Ways to Cast Performers of Color Right Now

There are Plenty of Reasons and Ways to Cast Performers of Color Right Now

This weekend I had the pleasure to see both “Come from Away” and “Dear Evan Hanson.” Rest assured, this piece isn’t a review on either (or both) shows because if you’re reading this, you probably already know the main plot points to each. Instead, this is to highlight how casting people of color makes sense in virtually ANY scenario of ANY show.

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Having Fun with Gilbert & Sullivan in 2018

Having Fun with Gilbert & Sullivan in 2018

People often ask, who were Gilbert and Sullivan? Or what are Gilbert and Sullivan? My best answer is usually in comparison with William Shakespeare. They don’t have the same style, however, in many ways, they’re treated the same in terms of them both being their own genre in a sense. I wasn’t introduced to Gilbert and Sullivan’s operas until more recently, but they have left a unique impression on me. I knew of several of their operas in the past but had no idea these two men were behind the comic and iconic madness of these shows.

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Children Need to Keep Playing Children on Broadway Stages

(Matthew Murphy)

(Matthew Murphy)

Mindy Poon

In a recent article in Theatermania about children performing on Broadway, Zachary Stewart asserts, “... and while I'm sympathetic to the call for representation of all types of people onstage, I don't think it needs to be perfectly literal. Ultimately, by insisting on actual kids to play kids, we're encouraging unimaginative storytelling for unimaginative audiences.”

They even went as far as saying child performers aren’t worthy of earning Tony Awards.

I wholeheartedly disagree with his assumptions from the standpoint of not only an audience member but also as a mother of three professional, child actors working in the industry for over ten years.

I can say for sure, that as a child, I would not have enjoyed seeing an adult actor playing Orphan Annie or Mary Lennox or Little Red or Oliver. When I saw those shows, and when I see shows with children in the cast now, I want to connect with the innocence of a child and the childlike realness that she or he brings to the character.  I enjoy hearing childlike voices and their timbre singing the songs that are written in keys to capturing their wonder and possibility. This is undoubtedly not unimaginative, yet the opposite.  I would not have enjoyed adults playing kids in Runaways, which was recently at The Delacorte this past summer after playing Off-Broadway at New York City Center two years ago. My young teenage son could bring a depth, connection, and understanding to the role that a grown person could not.

I find it difficult to accuse the late Elizabeth Swados of “unimaginative storytelling,” or for that matter Sam Pinkleton or The Public Theater who chose to cast children and teens to represent them at their annual gala this past year. The same could be said for the creatives of Billy Elliot, or The King and I, or A Christmas Story, or even Macbeth where the murder of a child is best represented by a child. ( My children have had the good fortune to be in all of these shows.) Many stories cannot be told properly without children being a part of the storytelling. No amount of “imagination” is going to change that.

The argument could be that this is work, and it is just unethical to allow children to work.  Anyone who knows any Broadway children and families personally will know that when children are as passionate as these kids are, the most ethical and moral thing to do as a parent is to help them pursue their passions.  Broadway children are akin to Olympic athletes.  They have a drive and motivation that is hard to contain.  We would not thwart our young chess champ or violin prodigy; so why would we stop a child who is capable of the juggling and balance that professional performing requires?  And yes, each show is different in the way children are treated backstage, but I can assure you, no child is doing this who does not love it! It is not possible because a child works two full-time jobs when he is on Broadway, and this takes discipline and focus, but it does not mean childhood is lost. 

Every family that I have met over the years focuses on keeping the balance for their children). It just isn’t what it seems like to the outside world. Ninety-nine percent of the kids who work on stage are the most humble, hard-working people you will ever meet.  It is wrong even to imply that time in a Broadway show could somehow make any child actors divas or that “... done wrong, you can find some zonked-out robots who sound like they've been media-trained by Stepford Wives...” as quoted by Hayley Levitt in the same article in Theatermania. Quite the opposite is true.  Reporting this kind of stereotype, even saying that it may only happen occasionally, perpetuates the idea of Mama Rose and the unwilling child actor. I know over 50 child actors, many who have sat in my home studying for tests, writing music, planning benefit concerts, singing karaoke, baking cupcakes for the Broadway Flea Market...just being genuinely good people. 

Did performing in a show harm those kids or enrich their lives?  Did having them in the show enhance the performance or hinder it? Did the life skills that child actors gained of:  time management, delaying gratification, self-motivation, patience, problem-solving, collaboration, innovation, creativity, fortitude, cooperation, and self-sacrifice contribute to the building blocks of their character? As my youngest child, William Poon said, “Kids need to be played by kids. Kids can do this.” He knows as well as anyone even at age twelve, having been on the international tour of Beauty and the Beast and then playing a royal child in The King and I at Lincoln Center all the while juggling third and fourth grades. 

Kids in Broadway shows are a special breed for all the right reasons, and they should continue to be an integral part of the Broadway community and bring a realness to the stage that only youth can afford.

Yes, Larger Men Can Play Hamlet

Yes, Larger Men Can Play Hamlet

In Act 5, Scene 2 of ​Hamlet ​by William Shakespeare, Hamlet is described by Queen Gertrude as “fat, and scant of breath.” This comment comes during Hamlet’s fight with Laertes. I even​ checked the Folio, Hamlet is fat. So, why aren’t there more fat Hamlets?

People seem to be very particular with which kind of actors play which parts and they seem to always comment on someone’s race or gender when they want to bring into question the legitimacy of someone’s performance. So, I ask again. Why aren’t there more fat Hamlets?

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A Black Actress Cast as Elle Woods? Oh My God Yes!

A Black Actress Cast as Elle Woods? Oh My God Yes!

If race isn't a factor in the character description, then anyone should be able to play it. Right?

A theatre company based in Seattle is doing just that with their upcoming concert productions of Legally Blonde by casting a black actress in the lead role of Elle Woods. Accomplished actress Alexandria Henderson is taking the reigns of the popular role for the SHOWTUNES production opening later this month.

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Gay for Pay, or Sexuality on Stage

Gay for Pay, or Sexuality on Stage

How do you audition someone’s sexuality? That comes up for me more times than I am comfortable with. I am a director who, when given the choice, works on plays and musicals that are queer-themed stories with non-straight characters. As a gay man myself it is also very important to me that I get to work with other queer identifying artists both on and off stage. But, how do I go about getting that information during the auditions process? 

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