Review: “Romeo and Juliet” at Shakespeare in the Parking Lot

Review: “Romeo and Juliet” at Shakespeare in the Parking Lot

Rain could not stop this performance of one of Shakespeare’s most well-known plays. The crowd gathered, umbrellas raised, to see Shakespeare in the Parking Lot’s production of “Romeo and Juliet”. This very enjoyable production took the classic story and gave it an 80s/90s spin, with costumes from those decades bringing the characters even closer to reality and allowing us to relate to them more than we already could.

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Review: “Three Musketeers 1941” at A.R.T/New York Theaters

Review: “Three Musketeers 1941” at A.R.T/New York Theaters

“Three Musketeers 1941” was an exhilarating theatrical experience that brought classic characters into a more relevant time period without making them feel too modernized. It unflinchingly portrays the World War II era and gives us characters we can no doubt relate to as well as hope for.

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Review: “Carcass” at Shetler Studios

Review: “Carcass” at Shetler Studios

“Carcass” is a new play by Eddie Vernovsky that chronicles the story of Eric (Vernovsky),  a depressed young man who is struggling to find his purpose in life. This is made all the more difficult by a girlfriend he doesn’t really like and a family that pushes every button and crosses every line. “Carcass” had the potential to be a great family/relationship drama about a broken man searching to be whole, but unfortunately, very few of the characters felt fleshed out enough to where I wanted to know what happened to them, and the spiritual journey of Eric felt very simplified.

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“Antigone” at the In Scena! Italian Theatre Festival NY

“Antigone” at the In Scena! Italian Theatre Festival NY

Telling the classic story of the doomed daughter of Oedipus, Debora Benincasa’s one-woman adaptation of “Antigone” is incredibly refreshing. Beginning with an acknowledgement that we are about to watch a play, this version of “Antigone” sets the tone of the piece right away. Benincasa brings great humor and thoughtfulness to a piece that is typically tragic and free of much laughter. She knows this too, even encouraging you to recall sad things like your spouse leaving you or your mother yelling at you in order to get you  in the right frame of mind, because, as she says, it’s a tragedy, afterall.

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Review: “Friendly’s Fire” at Theater at the 14th Street Y

Review: “Friendly’s Fire” at Theater at the 14th Street Y

“Friendly’s Fire” is a new play by John Patrick Bray, following Gulf War veteran, Guy Friendly (Matthew Weitz), as he struggles to maintain control of his mind and emotions as a drug attack from a recent lover brings out his, already prominent, PTSD. He creates visions and a whole cast of characters that help guide him to a deeper understanding of himself. Along for the ride is his friend Todd (Adeyinka Adebola), who, not seeing any of what Friendly is seeing, goes along in the hopes that, while they wait for help, he can understand his friend just a little better. What follows is a play incredibly moving in story and almost psychedelic in atmosphere.

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Review: “The Buffalo Play” at The Tank

Review: “The Buffalo Play” at The Tank

Taking place entirely in a jail cell near Yellowstone National Park, “The Buffalo Play” tells the story of a Woman (Ciara Griffin) as she is visited by the vision of a buffalo (Kendra Potter), after having just taken a baby buffalo and put it in her car because she thought it looked cold. This eventually leads to the baby being rejected by the heard and having to be euthanized. The Woman and the Buffalo discuss life and nature and the morality of human interference. Combing realistic and abstract elements, this new play by Ciara Griffin and Kendra Potter, explores human’s relationship with wildlife and our internal connections to the nature around us.

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Review: “Miseducated: an oral history of sexual (mis)education” at The Tank

Review: “Miseducated: an oral history of sexual (mis)education” at The Tank

Sex Ed is something that everyone has had some sort of encounter with in one way or another, whether it was  extremely restrictive in the information given (perhaps even no information at all) or given way too much information to the point of confusion. Often as we grow older we find that the information that we received as children was a little off or just downright wrong. This is what “Miseducated” is about.

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Review: “Spanker Machine” at BAAD and the Bernie Wohl Center

 Review: “Spanker Machine” at BAAD and the Bernie Wohl Center

“Spanker Machine” is performed through the In Scena Italian Theater Festival and tells the story of a young woman, Anita, as she tries to make sense of the most traumatic moments of her life through dressing up as her favorite characters (Sailor Moon, Anne of Green Gables, Oren Ishi). Tormented by a mother who never accepted her controversial sexuality and a lover, Marco, who left without explanation, she finds refuge in her characters. We as the audience are given details of her life outside of the characters through, phone calls and Anita’s stories.

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Review: 'The Bigot' at the Theatre at St. Clement’s

Review: 'The Bigot' at the Theatre at St. Clement’s

Taking us back to those uncomfortable holiday dinners, this new play by Gabi and Eva Mor, tells the story of homophobic, racist, and all around bigoted, Jim. Jim’s narrow views and downright offensive language make him a very hard person to be around. Even his own son, Seth (played by Dana Watkins)  is exhausted with trying to get his father to understand just what is wrong with some of the things he says. Yet, with his father’s health waning and Seth the only one to take care of him, he hopes that he can use his time with his father to try and open his mind a little. Seth, along with the help of Jim’s next door neighbors, Paula and Aysha,(Played by Jaimi Paige and Faiven Feshazion) whose romantic relationship Jim has expressed extreme distaste for, attempt to open up Jim’s eyes to a world beyond his narrow understanding.

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Review: 'The Battles of Richmond Hill' at HERE

Review: 'The Battles of Richmond Hill' at HERE

Written by Penny Jackson and taking place in the Dublin Rose Irish Bar in Richmond Hills, Queens, “The Battles of Richmond Hills” tells the story of Sheila O’Connor, the O’Conner family and the “battles” they face every day, such as loss, substance abuse, addiction, and the inability to let go. It’s a story about family and what keeps it together as well as what tears it apart and how long one can keep grasping at the past before it slips between their fingers.

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“Jilted to Perfection” at The Triad Theatre

“Jilted to Perfection” at The Triad Theatre

With a book, music, and lyrics written by Debra Cook, “Jilted to Perfection” tells the story of a divorced Mormon mom and her growing relationship with a scientologist actor/director. Through this relationship she takes many risks, makes many sacrifices, and watches her life change before her eyes.  Told mostly in a monologue with songs throughout, Cook takes us through her life in this new musical.

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Review: 'Johannes Dokchtor Faust' at Theatre For the New City

Review: 'Johannes Dokchtor Faust' at Theatre For the New City

Taking the classic story of the ambitious Doctor Faust and presenting it through well-crafted marionettes, the Czechoslovak-American Marionette Theatre gives a more light-hearted and somewhat modern take  on the story, with jokes galore and plenty of references to pop culture and the happenings of today.

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Review: 'Miranda From Stormville' at IRT Theatre

Review: 'Miranda From Stormville' at IRT Theatre

A modern retelling of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”, “Miranda From Stormville” tells the story of nineteen-year-old Miranda living in Stormville, New Jersey with her sick father and his caretaker Ariel. After a mysterious storm, they are visited by two stranded travelers, Will and Steve who have found themselves stranded after crashing their car on a nearby highway. Outsiders to the mysterious Stormville and stuck waiting for their car to be repaired, Will and Steve discover that there may be more to this hidden New Jersey town and the people living there than they thought.

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“The Tallest Man in the World” at The Tank

“The Tallest Man in the World” at The Tank

Telling three intersecting stories, “The Tallest Man in the World” takes us through the fragmented mind of a man struggling with alcoholism and how that affects those around him. At the same time, we are taken to a far-off island in Ireland, home of the tallest man in the world. We see him struggle with his isolation and loneliness, a perfect mirror to the alcoholic memories of the first man.

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“Henry V” at The American Theatre of Actors

“Henry V” at The American Theatre of Actors

Telling the classic story of Henry V’s clash with France and the bloody war that followed, director, Mary Lou Rosato brings us the story once again with an effective minimal set and a large and engaging cast.  Henry V was brought to life by Laris Macario, who balanced the commanding presence of the battlefield with the warm compassion towards his fellow men very well. At first it felt as though Macario was simply screaming through his lines but this improved as the play went on.

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Review: “The Glen” at Shetler Studios

Review: “The Glen” at Shetler Studios

“The Glen” , set mostly in the 1940s and 50s, follows the life of Dale Olsen as he transitions through being a young man living on a farm in Northern California to joining the U.S Army. Telling a story of belonging, identity, and family, Dale must make sense of the world around him and ultimately himself. This makes for a very heartwarming and sometimes, tragic story that many can relate.

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Review: “Between the Threads” at HERE

Review: “Between the Threads” at HERE

“Between the Threads” is a new work of theatre by the Jewish Women Project featuring six female identifying artists as they explore their own identities as jewish women in America today as well as their connections to the traditions of the past. Told through the multiple perspectives of the six women accompanied by music and dance, “Between the Threads” asks the question “What does it mean to live between the world of tradition and the modern world, as a jewish woman?”

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