College for Performing Arts: Do's, Don'ts & Some Food For Thought

College for Performing Arts: Do's, Don'ts & Some Food For Thought

Conservatory, or liberal arts school?  What aspects of a program should I look at? Should I pick up a minor or double major, or put everything into my performing arts major? For students considering pursuing an education in performing arts, particularly musical theatre, these questions are among the many flying around as they consider different schools and prepare to audition and/or choose where to spend the next few years of their lives.

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10 Things I Would Tell Myself as a Freshman Musical Theatre Major

10 Things I Would Tell Myself as a Freshman Musical Theatre Major

Coming into college, I saw several articles of what freshmen should know, but being a freshman in a musical theatre program is its own battle. Thankfully I had several people step in as mentors to guide me along the way, but still, there are some lessons I had to learn on my own

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The “Dream School” Myth

The “Dream School” Myth

As a Junior/Senior in high school, I remember being told the “one” would, “just feel right,” and it would be the school I could “see myself thriving.” Now, these statements aren’t entirely incorrect; however, they set me up to expect this magical feeling when I stepped foot on the campus where I should spend four years of my life. 

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Designers Are Artists, Too: The Necessity of Supporting Tech in Educational Settings

Designers Are Artists, Too: The Necessity of Supporting Tech in Educational Settings

In many theater programs, design is considered a luxury. Either due to budget constraints or simply a lack of interest and energy, many educational and community theater settings keep things simple out of necessity. There is absolutely something to be said for sleek, clean designs, but I worry that this mentally of seeing technical elements as an indulgence creates a misunderstanding of what design has the capacity to be, and hinders the enthusiasm of students who might be interested in pursuing it.

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How to Succeed in Theatre- Without Higher Education

How to Succeed in Theatre- Without Higher Education

Colleges and conservatories are expensive. There’s no other way to say it, they just are. Unless your family has set aside money for you to do so, pursuing higher education means you’ll likely spend your senior year, and the next four years in a formal education program struggling to get loans, scholarships, and side hustles, often requiring you put yourself in some extreme cases of exhaustion and stress. A social life will be difficult to maintain, Saturdays will be spent at work, mornings before class shared with coffee and overdue homework, afternoons will be taken up by running from class only to miss your bus to work and mean you have to beg someone for a ride, and after all of that you’ll still trudge need to the library at 2 AM to photocopy the textbook you can’t afford. If that sounds like a lot to handle, you can find an alternative route. That’s also terrifying. It really is- I know. I’m following that alternative route.

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How to Recover From a Bad Show

How to Recover From a Bad Show

I spent opening night of my recent show sitting at the back of the auditorium, poised to run backstage and fix problems. It didn’t start out that way. I gave a curtain speech and felt the excited buzz of anticipation as I sat and watched the show begin. And then… the mics didn’t work. And the curtains caught, three times. And a trumpet was left onstage. And two actors who had never had so much as a slip of the tongue in rehearsal froze and forgot their lines. Props weren’t checked, or went missing after being checked.

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The Secret of Happiness at College Is...

The Secret of Happiness at College Is...

The secret of happiness is knowing that happiness is always and only temporary. After all, a well-written character is never happy the entire show. Characters who appear to be happy either have joyfulness (sometimes through ignorance) or hide away when they are no longer happy. Additionally, we only see about two hours of glimpses into their lives.

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Please Stop Telling Conservatory Students They "Didn’t Go to a Real College"

Please Stop Telling Conservatory Students They "Didn’t Go to a Real College"

As graduation season is upon us, I would like to take the time to say congratulations! Congrats to everyone who graduates or have already graduated this year! Especially those who pursued a career in the arts. That is no easy task! Coincidentally I too have graduated this year as well (Congrats to the 134th class of The American Academy of Dramatic Arts!), and above all, I would like to say one thing.

Please stop telling the conservatory students they didn’t go to college. I’m getting really sick and tired of being told I didn’t go to a real college, and I bet some people who are reading this are too. 

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Dear Freshman Theatre Majors

Dear Freshman Theatre Majors

Acting is thrilling and terrifying. Acting is rarely not daunting at least at one point in a process of a show (auditions tend to be). Actors have to be very vulnerable to complete strangers, or even worse to people they know. Your journey as a Theatre/Musical Theatre Major will be rewarding, taxing, disheartening, enchanting, and wonderful. Here are some points that I wish I knew or had taken to heart and embraced early on as my mentality.

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Theatre and Musical Theatre Students in a Department: What’s The Relationship?

Theatre and Musical Theatre Students in a Department: What’s The Relationship?

As a musical theatre student in a competitive performing arts program, I have witnessed the dynamics between the different majors. Particularly, I have seen how the theatre and musical theatre students navigate the program, and how it can often be different from each other. These students will often stick together by major, even to the point of joining different student theatre clubs where students could usually mingle and exchange experiences. Therefore, this makes the circles rather closed off to each other.

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Favoritism in Casting School Theatre

Favoritism in Casting School Theatre

We've all been there. You read a play and immediately start casting it in your mind. If you've been teaching in the same place for a while and you're lucky, you have a core group of devoted students who come back for each play, no matter what you decide to produce. They know you and how you prefer to work, and you know their capabilities. But does that influence your casting? Should it?

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Is Drama a "Real Degree"?

Is Drama a "Real Degree"?

I'll never forget the shifts at the bar, where men in their 50's who have been plumbers all their lives, tell me that my choices will lead me nowhere in life, and I'll fail no matter what I do. Thank you, Barry, I'm so glad I never asked for your opinion in the first place.

No, we may not have to sit in a silent hall for an hour and write exams, but drama students will be damned if anyone says they don't work hard. There are so many unseen hours that go into what makes a performance happen - more than just the cast "standing on a stage and saying some words".

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Some Group Strengthening Exercises for Drama Class

Some Group Strengthening Exercises for Drama Class

When attending drama classes, one of the main goals should be to achieve a strong connection in a dynamic group. One of the best ways to do this is by working with exercises that focus on awareness, eye contact, and attention. Not only have these exercises helped my theatre group to grow stronger, but also myself as an individual to grow more disciplined and adaptable to different kinds of groups

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Teaching Theatre: "Is Anybody Out There?!"

Teaching Theatre: "Is Anybody Out There?!"

Teaching theatre can be lonely.

Wait. What?! How can teaching be lonely? You’re literally surrounded by people all…day...long.

Yes. True. Surrounded by people. People in your classroom who hopefully love theatre and love you. Surrounded by your students. Hopefully surrounded by supportive teaching, admin, and school staff. Maybe supportive parents and guardians too.

But, teaching theatre is lonely.

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